Not just any old iron

The old iron gates pictured here are on Queen’s Wharf, Wellington. In the background is the Wellington Museum of Wellington City and Sea, sheathed in white plastic sheeting but open for business, nevertheless. (What are they doing, I wonder? I’m still trying to find out.)

The Heritage New Zealand website offers the following description:

“The Wellington Harbour Board Wharf Gates, Posts and Railings are dotted along the city-side of the former Wellington Harbour Board (WHB) port area at Lambton Harbour. Constructed in phases from 1899 to 1922, these iron boundary markers represent the wealth and strength of the organisation which was crucial to Wellington’s economy for over a century. …

“Beginning in the late twentieth century portions of the WHB gates and fences were removed, due to the shifting of the port facilities to the north of Lambton Harbour and leisure and public access becoming a focus for much of the former WHB space. All of the remaining pockets of gates, posts, and fencing form an important part of the historical complex of the former port, visually linking a large area running along Waterloo, Customhouse, and Jervois Quays, from Wellington Harbour Board Shed 21 to the south of Lambton Harbour at Taranaki Street Wharf.” (Wellington Harbour Board Wharf Gates and Railings)

In researching the history of the gates, I found a facsimile of an item in The New Zealand Herald, Volume XXXVI, Issue 11245, dated 14 December 1899, Page 5, which states:

“Two sets of iron gates are being placed at each of the entrances to the Queen’s Wharf. They are very handsome. They are surmounted by large globe lights. The Harbour Board, to quieten the fears of the promenaders, state that no interference will be allowed with persons of either sex visiting the wharf at reasonable hours, but the officers on duty will have instructions to note the condition of persons going to the vessels alongside.” (Papers Past)

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s