Bond Street impasto

Bond Street back story

Between January and April 2015, Bond Street [in Wellington, New Zealand] was transformed with temporary changes to the way the street looked and was used to bring colour and energy to the area.

Bond Street is an important street for servicing local businesses, we wanted to make it a destination for pedestrians as well. To explore ways of making it work for both people on foot and businesses, temporary changes were made to the layout and use of the street before looking at possible long-term changes.

To catch people’s attention and bring vibrancy to the street, two outdoor seating areas and an artificial lawn area were installed. The road surface was painted with a bright red pattern and a shipping container was located on the site to host events. Urban designers call this type of project ‘Tactical Urbanism’ and there are many successful examples of these projects internationally and locally.

What Would Happen If We Just Gave People Money? — Discover

Would a basic level of income change the world for the better? At FiveThirtyEight, Andrew Flowers writes on how guaranteed income is gaining traction.

via What Would Happen If We Just Gave People Money? — Discover

Te Mata Coleraine 2013

Te Mata Coleraine 2013 (16 March 2015)

Te Mata Coleraine 2013 (16 March 2015)

A six-pack with a difference, this box of Coleraine 2013 held still for me and my camera at Wineseeker, Wellington. I’ll be adding only a single bottle to my modest Coleraine collection, but I’ve been given a spare box to house them in.

Te Mata Estate released Coleraine 2013 in the first week of March 2015. The final blend was 56% Cabernet Sauvignon, 30% Merlot and 14% Cabernet Franc.

“This is arguably the most important wine release New Zealand has ever seen,” according to the Advintage website. “Certainly, in our 15 years in this industry, we have never before seen such hype and anticipation surrounding a new vintage. But this is Coleraine. And it is Coleraine from the vintage of a lifetime.”

Advintage goes on to assert: “… 2013 sets a dramatic new standard for Coleraine – a wine already considered the pinnacle of Hawke’s Bay red wine production. It’s an ethereal, complete experience – plusher and weightier than previous vintages. Very clearly a new benchmark for New Zealand Cabernet Merlot blends has been set.”

“From the depths of its saturated inky appearance, Coleraine ’13 is a commanding statement of the vintage. Its powerful attack of beautifully ripened blackberries and black plums integrates with an accompanying surge of immediate tannin which quickly becomes the focus as the wine flows across the palate.

“Coleraine ’13 is a wine to contemplate, from a large glass, over several hours. It is a 30 year wine of impeccable style and character.” (Tasting note on Te Mata website)

“Coleraine derives its name from the Coleraine vineyard, home of John and Wendy Buck of Te Mata Estate. John’s late grandfather was born in Coleraine in Northern Ireland and the name has been maintained through the family home to the wine. Originally a single vineyard wine, from 1989 Coleraine has been an assemblage of the finest wines produced from distinct plots within Te Mata Estate’s oldest vineyards on the Havelock Hills.” (Cited on the webpage for Coleraine ’13)

Te Mata Estate was established in Hawke’s Bay in 1896, and wines have been made there for over a century. Specialising in high-quality wines of classical style, Te Mata sees itself as having been at the forefront of the modern rejuvenation of the New Zealand wine scene for the last forty years. “Every step in the production of our wines is undertaken by us, from grape growing and pruning through to winemaking and bottling.” “We are large enough to be well-resourced but small enough to concentrate on detail.” (Text adapted from descriptive material found on the Te Mata website)

Kintsukuroi

I have a beautiful handmade lidded jar which broke when, several months ago, the box in which it is stored took a tumble. This post about “kintsukuroi” reminds me (again) to repair my broken jar.

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Kintsugi means “to patch with gold”, a Japanese technique thought to have begun in the late 15th century, after a shogun sent a damaged Chinese tea bowl back to China to be fixed. It was returned held together with ugly metal staples, so Japanese craftsmen developed a way to repair the vessel by mending the cracks ornamentally.

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What exactly is matcha and why is everyone talking about it? – Eater

“Meet matcha, the current darling of the tea world. This finely milled green tea powder – the staple ingredient upon which traditional Japanese tea ceremonies were built in the 12th century – has seen a surge in popularity recently thanks to its visual appeal, purported health benefits, and beautiful, distinct flavor.” (Kathy YL Chan, in ‘Eater’)

word pond

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Portico project at an end

Now there's an end to it (13 February 2015)

Now there’s an end to it (13 February 2015)

Captured last Friday (13 February), when cloudy conditions prevailed, this image is my last shot before the portico was finally dismantled. (See my earlier story for details.)

I’d show you a picture of the gap, but it’s still too messy over there right now.

“The $800,000 project to remove the earthquake-prone overbridge between the library and council office started in November, and was intended to be finished by Christmas,” according to Ian Douglas, owner of The Village Goldsmith in nearby Mercer Street. Mr Douglas’ comments were reported yesterday by The Dominion Post, under the headline, “Overrun portico project ‘damaging retail trade’“.

“It’s been a complete debacle,” [Ian] Douglas said. “Now it is dragging through what is normally our three busiest trading months.”

The news story reports Council spokesman Clayton Anderson as saying there would still be a week or two of “finishing work” but the heavy machinery would be gone and people could again walk through the area to Civic Square.

 

Quake-risk portico: still going

still going (09 February 2015)

still going (09 February 2015)

Vivid colour is not usually a feature of my photographic image-making, but the high-energy scene presented here tells it like it was in Victoria Street a couple of days ago. And, as the job edges closer to completion, the validity of the old eighty/twenty rule is aptly illustrated.

Click on the link here to read my earlier story, Quake-risk portico: going, going, … posted on 26 January 2015.

Quake-risk portico: going, going, ... (26 January 2015)

Quake-risk portico: going, going, … (26 January 2015)