A meditation

Quite without effort,
words coalesce: the bright brooch
of significance.

A wisp, a whisper
of wistfulness, of wanting …
gritted teeth, desire.

Breathing empties me;
a single candle flickers,
sparks a forest-fire.

All futures blossom
on one ancient tree; sways still
the eternal dance.

(08 February 2015)

 

Meditating on the cross

chi rho (23 Jun 2012)

chi rho (23 Jun 2012)

.

.

.

The Staurogram (monogram of the cross) or Tau-Rho symbol is comprised of a tau (Τ) superimposed on a rho (Ρ). (Wikipedia: Christian symbolism)

The Chi-Rho symbol was also used by pagan Greek scribes to mark, in the margin, a particularly valuable or relevant passage; the combined letters Chi and Rho standing for chrēston, meaning “good”. (Wikipedia: Chi Rho)

The mysterious cypher appeared on the newly-laid asphalt near my apartment during June 2012. And there it remains to this day, awaiting the commencement of who-knows-what piece of work?

Given the significance that one might attach to such symbols, I am careful not to trample it underfoot.

While it serves me well as a focus of devout respect and meditation, I will be interested to see the work begin … whatever it might be, and whenever it might happen.

The passage into silence

Rumi image by Sandra Lesvigne

Rumi image by Sandra Lesvigne

.

.

.

Hear the passage into silence and be that. (Rumi)

Silence is the language of God,
all else is poor translation. (Rumi)

The world is everything that is the case. … Whereof one cannot speak, thereof one must be silent. (Ludwig Wittgenstein, in Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus)

It is the party season, and there is a lot of noise.

In recent days, I have become increasingly weary of arrogant and loud-mouthed persons – certain of them not even fuelled by alcohol – sounding off about the meaning of life, the universe, and everything.

Richard Dawkins, for one, would do well to keep silent on matters whereof one cannot speak.

__________

Jalāl ad-Dīn Muhammad Balkhī, also known as Jalāl ad-Dīn Muhammad Rūmī, and more popularly in the English-speaking world simply as Rumi, was a 13th-century Persian Muslim poet, jurist, theologian, and Sufi mystic. (Wikipedia

Laughing at the sky

When you realize how perfect everything is you will tilt your head back and laugh at the sky. ([fake] Buddha)

Sky over Washington Monument

Sky over Washington Monument

Bodhipaksa, a Buddhist teacher and author living in New Hampshire, considers that this now widely-known and popular saying “bears no resemblance to anything the Buddha’s recorded as having said.”

Bodhipaksa subsequently remarks that “Gautama doesn’t seem to have been big on laughter!”

To me, this fake Buddha quote certainly sounds like authentic Zen!

Commenting on the quote, Choying Lhundrap writes about the Tibetan teacher Minling Khandro Rinpoche, who, in her 2012 New Year address, combined it with words from Jean Houston:

“When you realize how perfect everything is you will tilt your head back
and laugh at the sky. At the height of laughter, the universe is flung into a kaleidoscope of possibilities.”

Which, for me, gets right to the heart of the matter.

But let’s give the last word to Albert Einstein: “Reality is merely an illusion, although a very persistent one.”

__________

George Draffan, responding to Bodhipaksa’s remarks, says it sounds like a stanza from a Tibetan Dzoghcen text that translates as:

Since everything is but an illusion,
Perfect in being what it is,
Having nothing to do with good or bad,
Acceptance or rejection,
One might as well burst out laughing!

(from chapter 1 of The Great Perfection’s Self-Liberation in the Nature of Mind, by Longchenpa, 1308-1364)

Zen trash

Zen trash (10 Oct 2011)

Zen trash (10 Oct 2011)

.

Tomorrow it will be a fortnight since moving day. Most of the cardboard boxes have been sliced open and their contents assigned at least temporary positions in the jigsaw puzzle of my new home.

And what is to become of the large quantities of cardboard and newspaper, the bubble-wrap and the Styrofoam that ensured the safe transit of all my treasures?

Most of the boxes are already knocked down: friends, foreseeing their own future moving day, will store them in their attic. Little by little, the newspaper is going out for recycling. The bubble-wrap, too, has a destination and a purpose.

Perhaps if I put the sheets of Styrofoam out next to the green bins, someone else will pick them up and take them away – which is, of course, how I acquired them.

__________
The image dates back to October last year, when I noticed one particular stack of trash put out for recycling by a Wellington retailer.